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Love Your Characters – more quick FMX story tips

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Last time in the FMX 2016 lecture series we discussed four story elements that help define your protagonist. For the next two articles, we’ll be focusing on a few things to keep in mind as you begin creating your story and your characters. The advice in this article is summarized and expanded upon from the FMX lectures given by USTAR Professor Craig Caldwell in his master class on story, and from speaker Christopher Lockhart (story editor at WME) in his lecture on cinematic stories. So, let’s get right into it with these quick and inspiring expert tips!

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Intention Cues

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Humans are terrible liars. Our body language constantly gives away what we are thinking and what we are about to do next. These are called intention cues and have landed countless criminals behind bars. For animators they are a treasure trove of gestures to sprinkle on your animation for extra believability. Learn how and when to use them here.

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Acting Tips from Ed Hooks

Ed Hooks Tips for Acting in Animation

I had the pleasure of attending the Acting for Animators workshop by Ed Hooks at this year’s FMX conference in Stuttgart Germany. Here are a few tips and tricks he mentioned to improve your animation! If you ever get a chance to attend one of his workshops, don’t miss that opportunity!

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Believable animation & finding your career path – Interview with Samy Fecih – UPDATE: Now also as mp3

In this interview lead animator Samy Fecih opens a treasure chest of valuable animation tipps and tricks. We talk about good and bad acting, working with reference, the challenges of realistic vs. cartoony styles and more… It’s an hour packed with animation know-how wrapped up with some advice for your demoreel and career path.

UPDATE: You don’t need no picture with your interviews? Click here for an audio only version to listen to. There are some tiny moments though where Samy shows stuff to the camera, but everything should still be understandable.